316. No Country for Old Men

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Movie: No Country for Old Men

Release Date: November 9, 2007

Director: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen.

Starring: Tommy Lee Jones, Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin.

Tag Lines: “There Are No Clean Getaways.”

“There are no laws left.”

“You can’t stop what’s coming.”

“One discovery can change your life. One mistake can destroy it.”

“How does a man decide in what order to abandon his life?”

“Nothing you fear… can prepare you for him.”

“You’ve never been anywhere like No Country.”

“One opportunity can change your life. One mistake can destroy it.”

“In the open country you can find anything, but every fortune leaves a trail.”

Awards: Academy Award for Best Motion Picture of the Year (winner), Academy Award for Best Achievement in Directing, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen (winner), Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role, Javier Bardem (winner), Academy Award for Best Writing, Adapted Screenplay, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (winner), Academy Award for Best Achievement in Cinematography, Roger Deakins (nomination), Academy Award for Best Achievement in Film Editing, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen (nomination), Academy Award for Best Achievement in Sound Mixing, Skip Llevsay, Craig Berkey, Greg Orloff, Peter F. Kurland (nomination), Academy Award for Best Achievement in Sound Editing, Skip Llevsay (nomination), Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Acto in a Supporting Role, Javier Bardem (winner), Golden Globe for Best Screenplay, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (winner), Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture – Drama (nomination), Golden Globe for Best Director, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (nomination), BAFTA Award for Best Director, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (winner), BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor Javier Bardem (winner), BAFTA Award for Best Cinematography, Roger Deakins (winner), BAFTA Award for Best Film (nomination), BAFTA Award for Best Screenplay – Adapted, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (nomination), BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor, Tommy Lee Jones (nomination), BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actress, Kelly Macdonald (nomination), BAFTA Award for Best Editing, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (nomination), BAFTA Award for Best Sound, Skip Llevsay, Craig Berkey, Greg Orloff, Peter F. Kurland (nomination), Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture (winner), Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role, Javier Bardem (winner), Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role, Tommy Lee Jones (nomination), Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Picture (winner), Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Director, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (winner), Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor, Javier Bardem (winner), Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Acting Ensemble (nomination), Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Writer, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (nomination), Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (winner), National Board of Review Award for Best Film (winner), National Board of Review Award for Best Acting by an Ensemble (winner), National Board of Review Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (winner), National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Film (nomination), National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Director, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (nomination), National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actor, Javier Bardem (nomination), National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Cinematography, Roger Deakins (nomination), New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Film (winner), New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Director, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (winner), New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actor, Javier Bardem (winner), New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Screenplay, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (winner), PGA Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures, Scott Rudin, Ethan Coen, Joel Coen (winner), Writers Guild of America Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (winner).

Relevance: Weird. Quirky. Bizarre. Odd. Genius. Coen. The words are synonymous.

The Coen brothers are excellent film makers and I have enjoyed all of their films immensely, but ‘No Country for Old Men’ and one more of theirs that will be watched later this year are in my opinion close to being a master class in film making.

I went to the theaters to see this film sometime before February 24, 2008, the night of that year’s Oscar telecast. I went in knowing I was going to like it, but I left absolutely loving it. It was a dark and gripping story that grabs your attention right from the opening scene and doesn’t let go until the end credits. Javier Bardem and his “bolt pistol” were absolutely terrifying. His performance was deserving of all of the accolades it received. Anton Chigurh has become one of the most memorable characters put on screen in the last twenty years.

I think what I revered most about this movie and the Coen brothers overall is their storytelling. They create such interesting and intense worlds and have the most delicious and humorous dialogue throughout their movies. Even their simplest of stories become epic by the well written and unforgettable characters that they create or adapt for film. Because of this, it makes it very easy to watch and re-watch their movies over and over again and be entertained every time, especially ‘No Country for Old Men.’

Today’s Thoughts: I probably haven’t seen this movie since 2008 when I bought the DVD after it won Best Picture at the 80th Academy Awards. It was just as thrilling today as it was back then. What a grim, suspenseful story, peppered with the right amount of humor as only the Coen brothers could do. Everyone in the cast, not just Javier Bardem, is at the top of their game.

I was completely taken in again with these characters and although I knew what was going to happen, I was still on the edge of my seat. What I noticed this time around, and I may have taken note of it when I first saw it but I don’t quite remember, is the score. Or shall I say “lack” of score. There is very little music in this movie. Usually a score adds so much to a thriller or suspense movie. But after watching this today, so does not having one. For me, it made it a tad bit more creepy.

And there is nothing in the world scarier than Javier Bardem’s now iconic hair in ‘No Country for Old Men.’ Nothing.

Ways to Watch: Vudu, YouTube, Amazon Prime, Google Play, iTunes, Hulu, DVD Availability.

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